Keep your finger on the pulse

Healthcare professionals join charity call for increased vigilance in Cervical Cancer Prevention Week

Healthcare professionals have added their support to the call for increased vigilance and regular screening as cervical cancer charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust kicks off Cervical Cancer Prevention week which runs from 22nd January.

Doctors and nurses at Sexual Health Teesside have reiterated the importance of attending regular cervical screening checks. After breast cancer, cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women aged 35 and under.

Every year in the UK, over 2,800 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and nearly 1,000 women will die from the disease. In addition around 300,000 women are told each year that they have a cervical abnormality that might require treatment. Regular screening can detect abnormalities that might become cancerous in the future.

The advice comes as Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust the UK’s only charity cervical cancer charity begins a week of activity for Cervical Cancer Prevention Week – a European-wide initiative lead by European Cervical Cancer Association (ECCA).

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust will be running a range of initiatives including holding a comedy night, carrying out an awareness campaign in bars, clubs, motorway service stations and shopping centres as well as holding a reception at the House of Commons on 25th January and an event for Black and Minority Ethnic Communities on the 26th January.

At clinics across Teesside posters have gone on display and leaflets are available to help raise awareness of the campaign.

Dr Deborah Beere, lead consultant in contraception and sexual health at the Sexual Health Teesside service, said: “Anyone who has missed a recent screening appointment, is worried about symptoms or who is concerned about cervical cancer should make an appointment to see us as soon as possible. Cervical cancer can be treated effectively if detected early on, but it is also largely preventable and regular screening is essential.”

Robert Music, director of Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust said: ”Despite being a largely preventable disease we are concerned at the numbers of women not taking up their screening invitation.

“Last year 20% of women overall didn’t attend screening whilst for those aged 25-29 37% didn’t go. This is a real worry and we need to remind women that they can take proactive steps to reduce their risk of cervical cancer by attending screening. Quite simply it can save their life!”

For advice and information on all sexual health concerns, including cervical cancer, patients should call 0333 000 0014 or visit www.sexualhealthteesside.nhs.uk.

ENDS

Media enquiries
Russell Elliott, Assura Stockton LLP. Telephone: 020 7380 1794
Robert Music, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. Telephone: 020 7936 7498
www.sexualhealthteesside.nhs.uk

Notes to editors

Assura Stockton LLP:

  • is a long-term collaborative joint venture partnership between Assura Medical and seven local GP practices and 49 GPs
  • is owned 50:50 by the GP practices and Assura Medical and is run by a Clinical Management Board (CMB) which comprises three local GPs, two practice managers, a business director and an Assura Medical representative. Assura Medical provides all the necessary support in the way of funding, service and commercial expertise, IT, business processes and additional resources; and
  • currently provides the Langbaurgh NHS Medical Centre in Redcar and the Stockton NHS Health Centre in Stockton

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust

  • Cervical Cancer Prevention Week 22-28 January 2012.
  • Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust (www.jostrust.org.uk) National Helpline 0808 802 8000.
  • Around three women in the UK die each day from cervical cancer, with someone being diagnosed every three hours facing an uncertain future. Over 300,000 women a year are told they may have a cervical abnormality that could require treatment.
  • It is estimated that the NHS Cervical Screening Programme saves 5,000 lives every year. Cervical cancer is predominantly caused by the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) which can be caught as soon as you start having intimate relationships.

 

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